Common Questions

Find answers to some common questions when using Storehouse.

  • Forking Projects
  • Forking projects creates a copy of a project that is under your control. You can do anything you’d like with this copy, including making code changes or creating your own variation of the source project. Uses Often, forking projects is used to create a copy of the project so future changes can be made and merged back into the source project. This is done often because the source project has restrictive permissions and requires users to submit their changes in Merge Requests rather than writing directly to the project.

  • SSH Host Keys
  • SSH utilizes Mutual Authentication. This means that your SSH client verifies the identity of the Storehouse server you’re communicating with to ensure nobody is intercepting your communications.

  • Public IPs
  • The Storehouse utilizes a static set of public IP addresses. These addresses are allocated and managed by Amazon Web Services, but are used exclusively by Storehouse.

  • Moving a Git Project
  • Sometimes, you might need to move your Git project to a new service or a new URL. Using a few simple commands, you can move your project while preserving all of your previous commits.

  • Updating Author Name
  • In order for your commits on your project to be linked to your Storehouse account, you’ll have to make sure that the author name or email in your version control program matches your Storehouse account information.

  • Choosing a Project Type
  • One important choice when creating a new project is your choice of version control programs. The Storehouse supports three programs: Git, Subversion, and Mercurial. Each have strengths and weaknesses for certain project types and give you choice depending on your preferences and workflow.

  • Setting Up Your Project
  • Once you’ve created a project, it’s time to add some files. Files are added through Commits or Revisions, which are essentially checkpoints for files in your project.

  • SSH Keys
  • SSH Keys are used to authenticate SSH clients, such as your version control program, and The Storehouse. This mutual authentication ensures that your client is correctly authorized and that you’re only sending project data to The Storehouse and not a malicious server.

  • Open Source Hosting
  • At The Storehouse, we are committed to helping furthering Open Source principals however we can. As part of this commitment, we offer free and discounted Storehouse services to projects that elect to publish their content under an Open Source license.

  • Generating SSH Keys
  • Follow these steps to setup a new SSH public key for use with The Storehouse. To access your project data, you’ll have to have a key setup.

  • Reauthentication
  • In order to better protect your account, we’ll sometimes ask you to login again even though you’re already logged in. We do this to ensure that key account and project settings cannot be changed if your account is inadvertently left logged in on another computer.